Tuesday, July 19th, 2022 html javascript utils • 158w

Every single time you have a input text field and submit-like button next to it, at some point, you would like to bind the same action of the submit button to the press of the enter key.

It's trivial, but also it's simply better to just copy-paste it. So here its is:

function onenter(ele, f) {
	ele.addEventListener('keydown', function (e) {
		if (e.keyCode === 13) { f(e); e.preventDefault(); }
	})
}

And also while we are here, instead of using the-not-be-named lib, just use these:

function q(x) { return document.querySelector(x); }
function qa(x) { return [...document.querySelectorAll(x)]; }
function range(x) { return Array.from({length: x}, (v, i) => i); }

For more just go here.



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Wednesday, June 16th, 2021 code javascript techniques • 252w

 So we have the requestAnimationFrame, you pass a function and it called after a very specific while (irrelevant to the following).

Now lets see the basic structure:

function loop() {
    update()
    requestAnimationFrame(loop)
}
loop()

Ok now lets wrap the function and call it without calling it by name:

(function loop() {
    update()
    requestAnimationFrame(loop)
})()

Is there any way to remove the name of function and still pass it? There is a magical object called arguments which appears out of nothing every time a function is executed. And the member that we need is arguments.callee which is self reference to the function being executed. So we get rid of the name:

(function () {
    update()
    requestAnimationFrame(arguments.callee)
})()

And of course to maximize the coolness we put in a single line:

(function() { update(); requestAnimationFrame(arguments.callee) })()

Ok, this very cool, but is it worth it? Let's analyze what this code succeeds to do:

1. Confuses the next reader of the code.
2. Confuses also the 2nd reader.
3. Confuses also the 3rd reader.
...
N. Confuses also the N-th reader.

So you have to choose what is cooler: confusing no people or confusing up to infinite people? Comment below, like and subscribe.



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Sunday, July 21st, 2019 code javascript techniques • 158w
So, I just wanted a simple thing... I had a static html page where I wanted to put some things in dynamically: a simple date at the start and an extended date in the middle of the text. (Also what is server side?)

Pure elegant javascript:

.... <span data-value="simple"></span> ....

<script>

var data = {
    simple: gen_simple(),
    ....
}

for (var i of document.querySelectorAll('[data-value]')) {
    i.innerHTML = data[i.getAttribute('data-value')];
}

<script>

Php infected javascript:

.... <script>document.write(gen_simple())</script> ....

plus if in 'I was never here' mode:

....
<script>
for (var i of document.querySelectorAll('script')) i.parentNode.removeChild(i);
</script>



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Wednesday, November 18th, 2015 code javascript utils • 145w
So we always start:

var canvas = document.getElementById("canvas");
var c = canvas.getContext("2d");

and we have the basic:

c.fillRect
c.fillText
c.strokeRect
c.strokeText

and for all other shapes we use paths

I use a lot of circles so why not add:

c.fillCircle
c.strokeCircle

We can do that by adding some functions to the prototype of the c with is the CanvasRenderingContext2D:

CanvasRenderingContext2D.prototype.fillCircle = function(x, y, r) {
  this.beginPath();
  this.arc(x, y, r, 0, 2 * Math.PI);
  this.fill();
};

CanvasRenderingContext2D.prototype.strokeCircle = function(x, y, r) {
  this.beginPath();
  this.arc(x, y, r, 0, 2 * Math.PI);
  this.stroke();
};


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Monday, November 16th, 2015 code css html javascript • 136w
To have a canvas as a html page background we need:

HTML:

<body onload="load()">
  <canvas id="canvas_back"></canvas>
  ...
</body>

CSS:

#canvas_back {
  position: fixed;
  top: 0px;
  left: 0px;
  z-index: -1;
}

JavaScript:

var c, w, h;

function load() {
  var canvas = document.getElementById("canvas_back");
  c = canvas.getContext("2d");

  window.addEventListener('resize', resize, false);
  resize();
}

function resize() {
  w = canvas.width = window.innerWidth;
  h = canvas.height = window.innerHeight;
  draw();
}

function draw() {
  // use c, w and h to draw the canvas
  ...
  requestAnimationFrame(draw);
}


Demo 1


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Wednesday, November 11th, 2015 code javascript utils • 121w
To store values to a browser we can use localStorage and sessionStorage just by:

localStorage["name"] = value;

and to get the values we just:

value = localStorage["name"];

The localStorage keeps the values for ever (probably).
The sessionStorage keeps the values until the page session ends.

For each domain our browser has a pair of these objects and not for each page.

To store objects without functions we use JSON:

localStorage["name"] = JSON.stringify(object);
object = JSON.parse(localStorage["name"]);


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Monday, November 9th, 2015 code javascript utils • 75w
If we want to use JQuery ONLY for selecting elements like:

$(".item")

Why use a whole library, just:

document.querySelectorAll(".item")

or

function q(query) {
  return document.querySelectorAll(query);
}

q(".item")

Note: The only thing we gain from this is self-something.


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